Fighting Gum Disease

Periodontitis refers to inflammation or swollen gums around the teeth. It actually begins in the alveolar region of the mouth and comprises tooth sockets connecting teeth to bone. More technically, these bones in the jaw are the mandible and maxilla. Periodontitis eventually eats away at the alveolar bone structure and, therefore, leads to tooth loss. Periodontal disease is essentially a bacterial infection that attacks the oral structure of the mouth. Effectively dealing with this aggressive type of bacteria is key to returning the gums and oral system back to normal. The first indication of a periodontal infection begins with plaque in and around the base of teeth and gums. Anyone who has their teeth cleaned on a regular basis is often chastised by the dental hygienist if there is more plaque than what normal. No matter how many times you’ve had your teeth cleaned, it’s almost impossible to get used to the slow, scratching sound that dental instruments make during the tooth cleaning process. The degree of plaque intrusion within the mouth is usually measured thought the taking of dental ex-rays, which is also an uncomfortable 30-40 seconds.

The most common gum infection is the dreaded gingivitis. These days almost, all oral or dental, products assert their ability to defeat, eliminate or control gingivitis. So prominent is the word gingivitis, that it’s become synonymous with other nefarious afflictions of the body such as heartburn or migraine headaches. However, if gingivitis is not properly controlled, it can lead to more advanced forms of gum disease such as chronic or aggressive periodontitis. These forms of gum disease result in the rapid deterioration of the gums and root system. It should also be noted that some of the advanced forms of periodontitis are responsible for increasing the risk of heart disease, diabetes, and even some kind of cancers.

So what are measures that individuals can take to reduce their risk of gum disease? The obvious, certainly include: brushing and flossing on a regular basis; using a mild mouthwash such as Listerine which has anti-gingivitis properties; and, last, regular visits to the dentist for thorough teeth cleaning and bi-annual x-rays. However, if your are one of those, that no matter what measures you take, still have problems ridding your teeth and gums of plaque and gingivitis, there are a few natural remedies that have shown promise. The right kind of diet combined with proven natural ingredients in a topical application, such as the gum doctor, will treat gingivitis, bleeding gums, receding gums, and even control offensive breath. The medical research speaks for itself by proving that advanced gum disease just doesn’t affect our oral health, it effects our overall health; therefore, we owe it to our teeth, gums, and bodies to do everything possible to ensure that we work to eliminate negative oral conditions.